Serra Council of Australia New Zealand and the South Pacific

Club Committees

Club Committee Structure

Each Serra Club has a Committee structure to plan and do the work of the Club. The most basic structure for a Club consists of six Standing Committees - Executive, Finance, Vocations, Membership, Programme and Communications. In addition, the President and the Board of Trustees may organise ad-hoc committees as needed.

The four Vice-Presidents serve as Chairs of their respective Standing Committees. Both the Executive and Finance Committees are made up of the Officers of the Club with the President serving as Chair of the Executive Committee and the Treasurer as Chair of the Finance Committee. Each Committee Chair may create Sub-Committees that are assigned specific tasks within the Committee area. Club Members are appointed to Committees by the President with the assistance of the Committee Chairs and other Club Officers.

A description of each Committee, its structure and composition is given below:

Club Vocations Committee

The primary responsibility of the Club Vocations Committee is to establish a comprehensive vocation programme through the joint efforts of the Bishop, Vocation Directors, Priests, Religious, Serrans and other lay persons.

The size of the Committee is determined by the nature of the job to be done. It should be small enough to facilitate good progress but both large and diverse enough to make the programmes work.

In larger Clubs, this Committee should consist of three to nine Members appointed on a rotating basis. Where it is deemed advantageous or appropriate, Sub-Committees may be appointed.

Members on the Committee should:

The Committee should:

The Committee also works closely with the Internal Programme Committee to help Serrans to gain a deeper understanding of, and appreciation for, Church vocations.

Club Membership Committee

The goals of the Membership Committee are

The primary responsibility of the Club Membership Committee is to establish a comprehensive membership programme and to obtain good, active members. Because of Serra’s need and demand for regular attendance (Members are expected to attend all meetings but must attend at least 55% of meetings), some particular Committee duties are:

The Committee should comprise two to three Members for each active Sub-Committee appointed on a rotating basis.

Members of the Committee should:

Typical sub-committees of the Membership Committee are:

The Committee should:

The Committee also works closely with the other Club Committees to help find the most suitable Club responsibility for each Member.

Club Programme Committee

The primary responsibility of the Club Programme Committee is to carry out the third principle of Serra, namely, “to assist its members to recognise and respond in their own lives to God’s call to holiness in Jesus Christ and through the Holy Spirit”.

Subjects for each programme are generally developed within the Committee which is chaired by the Vice-President for Programmes. By talking to other Club Members and by reading the Catholic press, Committee Members identify subjects relevant to the times. Subjects which interest each Club Member and make them enthusiastic about the continuing education program are subjects that would receive high priority during the Committee planning process.

The size of the Committee is determined by the amount of work to be done. The Committee should be small enough to facilitate good progress but both large and diverse enough to make the programmes work.

Where it is deemed advantageous or appropriate, Sub-Committees may be appointed.

Ideally, the Committee should consist of members who are:

The Chaplain should be an advisory member of the Committee.

The Committee should:

The Committee also works closely with the Vocations Committee so that vocations activities and internal programmes fully support each other and fulfil the three objectives of Serra.

Club Communications Committee

The primary responsibility of the Club Communications Committee is to establish a comprehensive communications programme and to facilitate good communications on Club, District, and International levels.

The size of the Committee is determined by the number and types of jobs to be done. There are specific responsibilities, such as producing a Newsletter, that may require a separate Sub-Committee with its own Board or Chair.

In general, the Committee should consist of a sufficient number of Members to accomplish the stated objectives. It is suggested that all Committee Members be appointed on a rotating basis. Where it is deemed advantageous or appropriate, sub-committees may be established.

Members on the Committee should:

The Committee should:

The Committee works closely with the other Club Committees to gather ideas and information that can be used in public relations efforts.

Ad-Hoc Committees

From time to time, a President may appoint a Temporary Committee to perform a certain function. Typical ad-hoc committees are:

 

For further information: SCANZSPAC, PO Box 1015, Woden ACT 2606, Australia Email: contact@scanzspac.org